August 19, 2004
New Mexico Public Education Department
300 Don Gaspar
Santa Fe, NM 87501-2786

Ruth Williams
Legislative Liaison
(505) 827-7803 or
Pager: 988-0582
rwilliams@ped.state.nm.us

2004 Scores Increase Substantially in All Categories
On Grades 4 and 8 Standards-Based Assessment

(Santa Fe, NM)--New Mexico’s fourth- and eighth-grade students made substantial increases on the New Mexico Standards-Based (or criterion-referenced) Assessment in 2004. In grade 4, student proficiency in math increased by five percent, and reading proficiency increased by four percent over 2003. In grade 8, reading proficiency increased by six percent and math proficiency increased by three percent.

The results, by individual district and school, are available by clicking here:

For the 2004 New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment Grade 4 and 8 Results for Reading by District and School (includes 2003 results; charter schools are listed in alphabetical order)

For the 2004 New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment Grade 4 and 8 Results for Math by District and School (includes 2003 results; charter schools are listed in alphabetical order)

For the 2004 New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment Grade 4 and 8 Statewide Summary for Reading and Math

Top 10 Performing Schools in Grades 4 and 8 from 2004 New Mexico Standards-Based Assessment

Increases were seen in all student subgroups, including gender, ethnicity, economic status, Special Education and English language learners (ELL), in grades 4 and 8.

“I am encouraged by this growth. We’re just beginning our journey, but the message is being heard that we’re raising the bar for all students. All means all. We must keep the pressure on and move full steam ahead. We must not let up,” said Secretary of Education Dr. Veronica C. García.

The 2004 results will be used to determine No Child Left Behind (NCLB) designations (formerly school ratings) on August 30. Schools will be designated as having made or not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) based largely on the performance of student subgroups on the assessment.

The assessment was given to 22,855 fourth-grade and 24,299 eighth-grade students in public, charter and state-supported schools in math and language arts. Students performed at the following levels: advanced, proficient, nearing proficiency or beginning step.

Overall, 49% of fourth-grade and 57% of eighth-grade students are proficient or advanced in reading and 58% of fourth-grade and 49% of eighth-grade students are proficient or advanced in math. This compares 45% of fourth-grade and 51% of eighth-grade students proficient or advanced in reading in 2003, and 53% of fourth-grade and 46% of eighth-grade students proficient or advanced in math.

The performance levels by ethnicity are as follows:

Language Arts Grade 4   Caucasian Black Hispanic Asian American Indian
Advanced 13% 5% 5% 17% 2%
Proficient 53% 39% 39% 46% 27%
Nearing Proficiency 24% 31% 33% 25% 39%
Beginning Step 11% 24% 23% 12% 32%

 

Language Arts Grade 8   Caucasian Black Hispanic Asian American Indian
Advanced 23% 10% 7% 26% 4%
Proficient 52% 42% 42% 54% 36%
Nearing Proficiency 18% 27% 32% 15% 37%
Beginning Step 7% 20% 19% 5% 22%

 

Mathematics Grade 4   Caucasian Black Hispanic Asian American Indian
Advanced 23% 7% 9% 36% 4%
Proficient 49% 42% 43% 37% 39%
Nearing Proficiency 16% 22% 23% 13% 26%
Beginning Step 11% 29% 24% 13% 31%

 

Mathematics Grade 8   Caucasian Black Hispanic Asian American Indian
Advanced 17% 6% 4% 26% 2%
Proficient 52% 32% 37% 50% 29%
Nearing Proficiency 16% 23% 24% 12% 26%
Beginning Step 14% 39% 34% 12% 41%

“Although the numbers need to strengthen and grow, it is heartening to see the achievement gap narrowing in New Mexico. We cannot rest until we see 100% proficiency in all subgroups. This early momentum must continue,” said Secretary Dr. García.

For economically disadvantaged students, the results are as follows:

Economically Disadvantaged Language Arts
Grade 4
Language Arts
Grade 8
Math Grade 4 Math Grade 8
Advanced 4% 6% 8% 3%
Proficient 37% 40% 43% 35%
Nearing Proficiency 34% 33% 24% 25%
Beginning Step 25% 21% 26% 36%

Secretary Dr. García called for parents to become actively involved in their children’s education. “Research has proven time and again that children with involved parents do better in school and are more successful in life,” she said.

She cautioned the public that if even one student subgroup falls short of making AYP, a school will receive an NCLB designation of not making AYP. “It my responsibility to alert the public that under NCLB, the lowest-performing subgroup will drive a school’s designation,” she said.