PRESS RELEASE - December 18, 2003
New Mexico Public Education Department
300 Don Gaspar
Santa Fe, NM 87501-2786

Ruth Williams
Public Outreach Director
(505) 476-0393

$1.98 Million Allocated to 34 Public School DistrictsTo Improve Student Achievement Through Technology

(Santa Fe, NM)--The New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) announced today that 110 schools in 34 public school districts would share in $1.98 million in state Computerized Learning System Grant funding to develop computerized learning systems capable of diagnosing students’ skill deficiencies in the core academic areas of reading, language arts and mathematics. The systems will automatically prepare lesson plans to address those deficiencies.

A total of $2 million in funding was included in the General Appropriations Act of 2003. The funding was envisioned by State Rep. Ben Lujan, speaker of the House of Representatives, as a way to help teachers align curricula and standardized testing and better meet the needs of culturally diverse students. Governor Bill Richardson is committed to improved student achievement through the use of technology in the state’s schools. The remaining $16,465 will support further implementation and analysis of the program.

“A critical need exists in New Mexico’s schools, especially those that serve students in high-poverty areas, to target improved achievement in reading, language arts and mathematics. These grant dollars will enhance learning options in those areas and support increased student outcomes,” said Secretary of Education Dr. Veronica C. Garcia.

Funding levels for each district or charter school were based on student enrollment. The funding amounts for each district and the schools targeted are as follows:

DISTRICT FUNDS AWARDED
Alamogordo Public Schools
Mountain View Middle
$25,000
Albuquerque Public Schools
Polk Middle
$25,000
Albuquerque Public Schools
Charter Schools:
East Mountain High School
Los Puentes Charter School
Public Academy for Performing Arts
Robert F. Kennedy Charter School
Southwest Secondary Learning Center
21st Century Public Academy
$25,000 each
Belen Consolidated Schools
Jaramillo Elementary, La Merced Elementary, La Promesa Elementary and Belen Middle
$75,000
Carlsbad Municipal Schools
Alta Vista Middle
$25,000
Central Consolidated Schools
Mesa Elementary, Naschitti Elementary, Newcomb Middle and Tse’ Bit’ ai Middle
$75,000
Chama Valley Independent Schools
Chama Middle, Tierra Amarilla Middle and Escalante High
$75,000
Cobre Consolidated Schools
Bayard Elementary, Central Elementary, Snell Middle and Cobre High
$100,000
Deming Public Schools
Bell Elementary, Chaparral Elementary, Columbus Elementary, Martin Elementary,
Memorial Elementary, Smith Elementary, Sunshine Elementary, Deming Middle,
Hofacket Mid-High and Deming High
$100,000
Espanola Public Schools
Eutimio T. Salazar Elementary, James H. Rodriguez Elementary and Carlos F. Vigil Middle
$100,000
Fort Sumner Municipal Schools
Fort Sumner Elementary, Fort Sumner Middle and Fort Sumner High
$25,000
Grants-Cibola County Schools
Laguna-Acoma Middle, Los Alamitos Middle, Grants High and Laguna-Acoma High
$100,000
Hagerman Municipal Schools
Hagerman Elementary, Hagerman Middle and Hagerman High
$25,000
Hatch Valley Public Schools
Garfield Elementary, Rio Grande Elementary, Hatch Valley Middle and Hatch Valley High
$100,000
Hobbs Municipal Schools
Houston Junior High
$25,000
Jemez Valley Public Schools
Charter School:
San Diego Riverside
$24,490
Las Cruces Public Schools
Loma Heights Elementary, MacArthur Elementary, Mesilla Park Elementary, Picacho Middle,
San Andres Learning Center
$125,000
Lovington Municipal Schools
Jefferson Elementary, Yarbro Elementary, Lovington Junior High, Lovington High and
New Hope Alternative High
$100,000
Mesa Vista Consolidated Schools
Ojo Caliente Elementary
$25,000
Mora Independent Schools
Mora Elementary and Mora Middle
$25,000
Pecos Independent Schools
Pecos Elementary
$25,000
Penasco Independent Schools
Penasco Elementary, Penasco Middle and Penasco High
$25,000
Pojoaque Valley Public Schools
Pojoaque Intermediate and Pojoaque Middle
$50,000
Portales Municipal Schools
James Elementary, Steiner Elementary, Valencia Elementary, Lindsey Elementary, Portales Junior
High, Portales High and Broad Horizons Educational Center
$100,000
Quemado Independent Schools
Quemado Combined Elementary and High
$25,000
Questa Independent Schools
Alta Vista Elementary/Intermediate, Questa Junior High and Questa High
$50,000
Questa Independent Schools
Charter School:
Red River Valley Charter
$25,000
Reserve Independent Schools
Glenwood Elementary, Reserve Elementary and Reserve High
$25,000
San Jon Municipal Schools
San Jon Elementary, San Jon Middle and San Jon High
$25,000
Santa Fe Public Schools
Kearny Elementary
$25,000
Santa Rosa Consolidated Schools
Rita A. Marquez Elementary, Santa Rosa Elementary, Anton Chico Middle, Santa Rose Middle and Santa Rosa High
$25,000
Socorro Consolidated Schools
Midway Elementary and Raymond Sarracino Middle
$99,045
Texico Municipal Schools
Texico Elementary, Texico Middle and Texico High
$25,000
Truth or Consequences Municipal Schools
Arrey Elementary, T or C Middle and Geronimo Trails High
$50,000
Tularosa Municipal Schools
Tularosa Elementary, Tularosa Middle and Tularosa High
$60,000
Vaughn Municipal Schools
Vaughn Elementary and Vaughn High
$25,000
Total Funded $1,983,535

Funding priority was given to schools serving a student population of 50% or greater that are eligible for free or reduced lunch and schools identified as probationary or for corrective action.

Under the Computerized Learning System Grant program, recipients must purchase one of two selected computerized learning systems from A+nyWhere Learning System® -- Educational Software Systems, Inc. of Cedar Crest, New Mexico, or The In$ite and Virtual Education System™ of Irvine, California. The two were selected by a team of classroom professionals and technology coordinators based on published criteria. Five vendors submitted applications to the NMPED in August.

The criteria included offering a computerized learning system capable of aligning the public schools’ curricula to the TerraNova and state standards-based tests, New Mexico’s content standards and benchmarks and adopted textbooks, diagnosing students’ skill deficiencies and automatically preparing lesson plans to address those deficiencies and measure objectives by grade level, providing reading, language arts and mathematics programs in English and Spanish and translating the programs into other languages and allowing teachers to extend and customize lessons.